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COLLEGE ART GALLERY 2 PAST EXHIBITIONS

FORMERLY EXIT FIVE: PORTABLE MONUMENTS TO RECENT HISTORY

Sep 17 - Dec 17, 2010
Curated by Shauna McCabe

Formerly Exit Five: Portable Monuments to Recent History features varying artistic responses to the interplay of landscape transition and collective memory internationally. This exhibition and dynamic work provides a backdrop for this artist-community collaboration, a setting to encourage reflection on the changing urban terrain and local landscape of Saskatoon and to introduce creative tools as means of expression and engagement.

While place and history retain currency, contemporary landscapes are defined by increasingly fluid understandings of location, memory, and identity. The modern pervasiveness of what Marc Augé described as the ”non-place” has taken shape not only as processes like urban sprawl and  the erosion of geographic particularities, but increasingly accelerated and condensed cycles through which landscapes are erased and transformed. Undermining traditional bases for the sedimentation of collective meaning and identification, the possibility for indelible markers of memory gives way to temporary reference points or vague terrains with always-dissolving boundaries bearing no trace of the past at all.

We are gearing up for Michael Alstad and Craig Leonard to arrive in Saskatoon as artists in residence. The two artists will be continuing their resesrch and investigations throughout saskatchewan to create new works for the exhibition Formerly Exit Five. In conjunction with the College Art Galleries, Formerly Exit Five is curated by Shauna McCabe and will be opening in the College Art Galleries on September 17th, 2010.  


Artists:

Vahram Aghasyan
Michael Alstad
Cyprien Gaillard
Sarah Graham
Paul Griffin
Isabelle Hayeur
Craig Leonard
Andrew King / Angela Silver

David Rokeby

Denyse Thomasos

 


DIABOLIQUE: PART TWO

Jun 18 - Aug 14, 2010
Organized by the Dunlop Art Gallery. Curated by Amanda Cachia

 

Matilda Aslizadeh, Rebecca Belmore, David Garneau,
Wanda Koop, Emanuel Licha, Althea Thauberger, Jason Thiry and Scott Waters

Diabolique raises intense concerns regarding the impact of violence, war and human conflict. This exhibition is an electric mix of social and political statements, evocative scenes and narratives that pose disturbing, puzzling, grotesque and surreal questions about human capacities for violence.


DIABOLIQUE: PART ONE

Mar 26 - Jun 4, 2010
Organized by the Dunlop Art Gallery. Curated by Amanda Cachia

Jake & Dinos CHapman, Douglas Coupland, Dana Claxton, William Kentridge, Fawad Khan, Shirin Neshat, Michael Patterson-Carver, Raymond Pettibon, Nancy Spero, Balint Zsako


Diabolique raises intense concerns regarding the impact of violence, war and human conflict. This exhibition is an electric mix of social and political statements, evocative scenes and narratives that pose disturbing, puzzling, grotesque and surreal questions about human capacities for violence.

The title of the exhibition is partially inspired by Les Diaboliques (1954), a black-and-white French classic terror film directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot. Artworks range from a charcoal drawing anamorphic animation to an exploding car bomb drawing, to a powerpoint slideshow of cartoon and graffiti-style social and political commentary from a notebook that was originally recorded on the east glass window exterior of Regina Public Library Central Branch in 2009. This artwork challenges our positions and pushes buttons.


 

 


KELLY MARK, STUPID HEAVEN

Jan 16 - Mar 6, 2010

Curated by Barbara Fischer

The College Art Galleries in collaboration with Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and the Blackwood Gallery (University of Toronto), presents the first major survey of works by Kelly Mark in Saskatoon. Bringing together key works from the last ten years, the exhibition includes drawing, sculpture, video, performance, and audio work, as well as multiples and recent, television-based projects.

An interest in everyday moments and monotonous activity is mixed in Kelly Marks work with deadpan humour and self-deprecatory purpose. In some of her earliest work, she focused on obsessive collecting and filling time with virtually nonsensical tasks like counting the grains of salt in a salt-shaker. More recently, her focus has shifted away from filling time wither own activity to making her work or her own presence the frame by which to observe the flux of time, of repetition and events, and of ritual endeavor in the world. One series of photographs records the same mannequin in a changing window display over the period of a year; another series documents the multifarious improvisations by which people have managed to attach notes to broken parking meters. In “Hiccup”, a multi-channel video-recorded performance, the artist is seen spending an identical amount of time doing exactly the same thing in the same location over several days, and thereby highlights the constancy of change around her—the weather, the light, traffic, people.